Kent Dyslexia Friendly Libraries

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Libraries & Archives Best Practice Guide

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Contents

Purpose

This document was prepared to help ensure we offer a fully inclusive service for people with dyslexia. It is aimed at Libraries and Archives staff and partners and demonstrates what we and others are already doing. It offers a best practice approach to the development and delivery of our service to adults and children with dyslexia.

Introduction-What is dyslexia?


Some Facts

Possible difficulties

Possible strengths

We hope that the guide will inform and inspire so that we can all contribute to making a real difference for this particular group of customers.


National Context

People with dyslexia come within the scope of the Disability Discrimination Act. All local authorities have a duty to promote positive attitudes between disabled and non-disabled people (Disability Equality Duty 2005)


What we are doing in Kent libraries


Dyslexia Friendly Criteria When Recommending Books

Dyslexia Action Dyslexia has selected books as dyslexia-friendly when they meet most of the following criteria:-

How to find Dyslexia Friendly Books

Book Suggestions

Ten dyslexia friendly books (From WikiREADia- Specially selected by Dyslexia Action)

Children with dyslexia in fiction. (Based on booklist produced by Birmingham City Libraries)

Non-fiction –exploring ways of coping with dyslexia

Biographies of Famous People with Dyslexia


Finding Support

National

Local


Appendix 1: Library Offer

How we can help you with your dyslexia

For more information contact Liz Taylor on 01622 696512 or email elizabeth.taylor@kent.gov.uk


Appendix 2: AbilityNet software available on all staff and public computers


Appendix 3: Making our information more accessible - British Dyslexia Association 2008

Font Style.

Paper.

Presentation Style.

Writing Style.

Readability scores.

When Microsoft Word finishes checking spelling and grammar, it can display information about the reading level of the document, including the following readability scores. Each readability score bases its rating on the average number of syllables per word and words per sentence.

To set your spell checker to automatically check readability, go to Tools, Options, Spelling, and Grammar, then tick the Readability request. Word will then show your readability score every time you spell check.

Flesch Reading Ease score:

Posters, boards and leaflets.

Increasing accessibility

Everyone processes information in a different style. It is important to consider this when presenting ideas and concepts. Some people might find it easier to access a long and wordy explanation whilst others may prefer an alternative style. For example:-

Text-reading software.

There are a number of points to bear in mind when preparing information for use with text readers.

Contact details

Elizabeth Taylor Service Development Librarian, Supporting Independence and Diversity Contact details: elizabeth.taylor@kent.gov.uk 01622 696426

Gillian Lawrence Lifelong Learning Manager Contact details: gillian.lawrence@kent.gov.uk 01622 605219

Christine Heald Service Development Librarian, Contact details: christine.heald@kent.gov.uk 01303 715901

Date: 30th December 2009

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